Tuesday, September 18, 2012

the only constant











images: via marin dearie

artist / designer marin dearie's "shades of change"

such lovely graphics and interesting facts. 
I can't help but love these, perhaps because they remind me of my color gradation studies from school. 

"Aprils never meant much to me, autumns seem that season of beginning, spring." - Truman Capote

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

his heart was a purple castle





images: all via my instagram

1. building on 2nd St, Philadelphia
2. 30th St. Station, Philadelphia
3 & 4. vintage typewriters
5. 7-9 East 72nd St, Manhattan
6. 9 East 72nd Street, Manhattan
7. closeup of door: 9 East 72nd St, Manhattan
8. The Lotos Club at 5 East 66th St, Manhattan by Richard Howland Hunt

Note on 5, 6, 7: -- for more information on what I believe to be one of the most beautiful homes in Manhattan (7-9 East 72nd St.), click here and here. Originally two separate homes -- each a masterpiece in its own right -- they have since been joined to form the largest private residence in NYC. (There's quite a history in between, as you might expect.) These two gilded age beauties were designed by different architects. The Jennings home (the "smaller" one on the left) was designed by Flagg & Chambers, and finished in 1899, whereas the Sloane home (right) was designed by Carrere & Hastings, and completed in 1896. Both are examples of the Beaux-Arts style that reigned during this time...and leaves us with some of our most beautiful architecture to date.

"I didn't want to disturb the silence around it, I suppose, or betray it by turning it into a story."
- Nicole Krauss

Saturday, September 8, 2012

cut it out







images: "instant" via style.com by alessandro garafalo

alexander wang spring '13 rtw 

one of the most anticipated shows of NYFW has officially walked. 
and delivered.
the essential black and whites.
crisp silhouettes chock full of cut outs and geometric undertones.

"I would rather sit on a pumpkin and have it all to myself,
than to be crowded on a velvet cushion."
- Henry David Thoreau